» Brunswick Truck Accident Attorney Praises New Hours of Service Rule

Brunswick Truck Accident Attorney Praises New Hours of Service Rule

Brunswick, GA (Law Firm Newswire) April 30, 2012 – The U.S. Department of Transportation changed its rule on hours-of-service for commercial truck drivers in an attempt to prevent highway crashes related to fatigue.

The new rule cuts the maximum number of hours a driver can work by 12 hours a week from 82 hours in a seven-day period to only 70 hours. Commercial drivers also will have to take a half hour break for every 8 hours they drive.

“The new hours of service rule will absolutely make our highways safer,” said Brunswick truck accident attorney Nathan Williams. “There will be some pushback from trucking and logistics companies, but better rested commercial drivers make for safer highways.”

Drivers will need to start paying more attention to their night driving, as well. The new rule requires that drivers rest at least two nights during a seven-day stretch between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. in order to get more rest when their body needs it, according to a Department of Transportation press release.

The DOT collected data from around the country and held listening sessions while encouraging feedback about the new rule.

“When the government can step in and set some standards for an industry that has a long history of pushing its employees to the brink, then I think that is going to be a positive thing,” Williams said.

The new rule has teeth. Companies found to be allowing drivers to drive more than 11 hours in a day can be fined up to $11,000 per offense.

Truck accident victims often have expensive recovery times with rehabilitation costs, health care expenses and lost time from work. The Williams Law Group has experienced truck accident attorneys ready to help victims recover financially from highway wrecks.

Nathan Williams is a Brunswick personal injury lawyer, Brunswick divorce attorney, criminal defense and Brunswick DUI lawyer in Southeast Georgia. Visit http://www.thewilliamslitigationgroup.com or call 1.912.264.0848.

The Williams Litigation Group
5 St. Andrews Court
Brunswick, GA 31520
Phone: 912.264.0848
Toll Free: 877.307.4537
Fax: 912-264-6299


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