» Discover Estate Planning Mistakes to Avoid With Michigan Estate Planning Attorney

Discover Estate Planning Mistakes to Avoid With Michigan Estate Planning Attorney

Bloomfield Hills, MI (Law Firm Newswire) March 15, 2013 – A Michigan estate planning and elder law attorney is presenting a free seminar on common estate planning mistakes to avoid.

Christopher Berry, certified Michigan elder law attorney from Witzke, Berry, Carter & Wander PLLC of Bloomfield Hills, an expert in estate planning, veterans benefits, Medicaid, life-care planning and the Affordable Care Act, is hosting a seminar for the public on common estate planning mistakes to avoid on Sunday, March 10 at 1:30 at Maple Village Senior Living, 6257 Telegraph Road, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interested attendees are advised that seating is limited. Contact Gloria to reserve a seat at 248-0723-6275.

“The good news is that, while we see among our clients that these estate planning oversights are commonplace, all of them are easily remedied,” says estate planning lawyer Christopher Berry. “And the time and cost it takes to work with an estate planning lawyer to remedy these oversights is just a small investment in the future of your estate, and will make a huge impact on your own security and the assets you leave for your loved ones.”

Common mistakes discussed will include dying intestate, i.e., without a will or other form of estate planning. Without estate plans in place at the time of passing, an individual’s assets are usually distributed according to what the Probate Court deems best. This can cost the estate substantial tax losses, and is also a public process, which allows creditors and others complete access to all available information about the estate.

Other common mistakes include: simply passing property directly to children without stipulations to protect the assets; failing to formalize joint property issues; not having one of the many possible types of trusts in place; not properly funding a trust; not regularly reviewing documents after establishing them; and either failing to establish, or not properly establishing a living trust, or advanced healthcare directive, to ensure wishes are followed during an incapacitating injury or illness.

Mr. Berry is an established public speaker on topics concerning estate planning and elder law. He is a Certified Elder Law Attorney (CELA), well-versed in the legal issues and estate planning challenges faced by the clients he works with as part of his comprehensive practice.

Learn more at http://www.michiganelderlawattorney.com/

The Elder Care Firm of Christopher J. Berry
2550 S Telegraph Rd.
Ste 255
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302
Local: 248.481.4000
Toll free: 855-41-Elder (855-413-5337)



  • Is your Michigan Caregiver for Your Senior a Felon?
    According to a disturbing article in the Daily Reporter, convicted felons are being paid to take care of our Michigan seniors, according to a staffer at the Area Agency on Aging. Melissa Franklin of the Area Agency on Aging states, “We have multiple care providers now who are on the sex offender registry.  There is […]
  • BIG NEWS: Supreme Court Holds Inherited IRAs are Not Protected Anymore
    In the big news department, the Supreme Court held in Clark v. Rameker that inherited IRA’s are not asset protected.  There were differing opinions on whether an inherited IRA would be protected against bankruptcy, however it is now clear that they are not. Here’s the facts, at death Ms. Heffrom owned an IRA worth about […]
  • Your Free Five Wishes Medical Power of Attorney Ain’t No Good.
    In my Michigan estate planning practice, I’ve had a ton of clients and financial planners bring up the Five Wishes as a way to handle end of life decisions.  Everyone over the age of 18 in Michigan needs advanced directives (sometimes called medical powers of attorney).  In Michigan we call these documents Patient Advocate Designations. […]
  • How to Title IRA Beneficiary Designations
    A common question I hear is “who should be named for beneficiaries of an IRA or retirement account?”  Should it be the spouse, the kids, the revocable living trust?  Typically, I hear, even professionals, say that it should be spouse first to accommodate a spousal rollover, then the living trust while the kids are minors, […]

See other news sources publishing this article. BETA | Tags: , , , , , ,



Get headlines from Law Firm Newswire sent right to your inbox.

* indicates required