» Distracted Driving: Keeping Teens Safe on the Road

Distracted Driving: Keeping Teens Safe on the Road

Chicago, IL (Law Firm Newswire) April 29, 2014 – It is more important than ever for parents to help teen drivers avoid distractions behind the wheel, says a prominent Chicago attorney.

“The fact is, cell phone use while driving is prevalent in all age groups. But it is especially dangerous for teenagers to be distracted while driving because they have less driving experience,” indicates Paul Greenberg, a Chicago car accident attorney. “Driving already requires attention to multiple tasks simultaneously, so it is risky to try to pay attention to anything else.”

Research suggests that many areas of the brain are still developing during adolescence, including areas responsible for making decisions and forming judgments. Such findings indicate that teenagers may have more difficulty managing distractions while driving.

Illinois law prohibits the use of handheld cell phones while driving, except for emergency calls. A hands-free device must be used instead. However, all cell phone use, including use with hands-free devices, is prohibited for all drivers under age 19. Texting while driving is prohibited for all drivers.

“Drivers under age 19 are not permitted to use cell phones while driving in any case,” points out Greenberg. “Parents can set a good example by not only following the law regarding hands-free devices themselves, but by choosing to limit all cell phone use while driving with their children, even if it is with a hands-free device.”

Although the use of a hands-free device allows the driver to use both hands for the task of driving, studies have shown that the cognitive distraction of the conversation causes many accidents. Personal technology may not even be the cause of a distraction.

“Drivers can be distracted by conversations taking place in the vehicle as well,” observes Greenberg. “That is why young drivers in their first year of driving are limited to one passenger under the age of 20 other than family members.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there were 3,331 deaths and 387,000 injuries caused by distracted driving in 2011. Among drivers under age 20 involved in a fatal crash, 11 percent were reported to be distracted at the time of the accident.

Briskman Briskman & Greenberg
351 West Hubbard Street, Ste 810
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: 312.222.0010
Facebook: Like Us!
Google Places: Contact a Chicago personal injury lawyer from Briskman Briskman & Greenberg on Google Places!

  • Wrongful death lawsuit filed over drowning death after swan attack
    The wife of a Villa Park man who died after being attacked by a swan has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the man’s employer and against the condo complex where he was working when he died. According to the lawsuit, Anthony Hensley had responsibility over two swans in the Bay Colony condo complex in [...]
  • Eleven million dollar birth injury lawsuit over Topamax stands
    In a recent birth injury lawsuit, a jury award of $11 million will stand after a judge denied a defendant’s motion for a new trial. The jury made the award in November 2013 in a lawsuit over birth injuries suffered by a child whose mother, Haley Powell, used the antiepileptic drug Topamax during pregnancy. The [...]
  • Birth Injuries: Three Common Causes
    Injuries sustained during birth can cause a child to suffer from serious medical conditions that will alter life for both the child and parents. Even more devastating is the fact that many birth injuries are preventable. Many result from the negligence of medical personnel (otherwise known as medical malpractice). Three of the most common causes [...]
  • IWCC rules a close call insufficient for a mental disability claim
    The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission recently ruled against a train operator who claimed a mental disability based on the trauma of believing that the train he was operating had struck and killed a pedestrian. The worker was operating a train exiting a tunnel when he observed two young men running across the tracks. The operator [...]
  • Doctors who lose licenses still collect from Medicare
    Several doctors who have committed medical malpractice and other offenses to such a degree that they lost their state licenses to practice medicine have been able to practice medicine in other states and to continue billing Medicare for their services. A Bloomberg News investigation found seven doctors who billed Medicare for a total of $6.5 [...]

See other news sources publishing this article. BETA | Tags: , , , , ,



Get headlines from Law Firm Newswire sent right to your inbox.

* indicates required