» American Urological Association (AUA) Debates Pros and Cons of Transvaginal Mesh Slings

American Urological Association (AUA) Debates Pros and Cons of Transvaginal Mesh Slings

Austin, TX (Law Firm Newswire) August 21, 2014 – Despite the thousands of lawsuits against the makers of transvaginal mesh slings, the devices are still in use.

“As more and more women file medical negligence lawsuits against the makers of transvaginal mesh slings, it would seem sensible to take them off the market. Such a decision would not be unusual for an allegedly defective product, but it does not seem that its manufacturers are interested in making it,” said Bobby Lee, an Austin lawyer who litigates transvaginal mesh lawsuits.

In one Oregon case, the victim no longer wants to get out of bed on some days because of the pain the mesh causes her. Since the implantation of a mesh sling two years ago, she has barely been able to walk. Her sexual life is negligible because the mesh now protrudes from her vaginal wall. She finds it hard to participate in activities with her children. In constant pain, she needs to wear Depends to handle the increased flow of urine – which was supposed to stop when the mesh kit was implanted. The promised relief from urinary incontinence never came for the plaintiff. Instead, the mesh made the problem worse.

Even though the plaintiff made several trips to her doctor about her pain and physical difficulties, nothing was done. She is now on a very long waiting list to have the mesh removed -- if the procedure remains possible for her. In some cases, the mesh grows into vital organs, and not all of it can be removed safely.

The consequences of implantation of this defective product can last many years; years of pain and other physical complications that may include permanent nerve damage.

”Even with documented cases like this one and thousands of others, there are specialists who still suggest the mesh is safe to use. They blame attorneys for this debacle because we are focusing on the mesh’s complications and risks. If the mesh is considered safe only by ignoring its complications, something is drastically wrong. Fortunately, most doctors will now explicitly tell you that the mesh causes serious complications, including urethral erosion, organ injury, bladder issues and organ exposure,” added Lee.

Lee, Gober & Reyna
11940 Jollyville Road #220-S
Austin, Texas 78759
Phone: 512.478.8080

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