» American Urological Association (AUA) Debates Pros and Cons of Transvaginal Mesh Slings

American Urological Association (AUA) Debates Pros and Cons of Transvaginal Mesh Slings

Austin, TX (Law Firm Newswire) August 7, 2014 – Despite the thousands of lawsuits against the makers of transvaginal mesh slings, they are still in use.

“As more and more women file medical negligence lawsuits against the makers of transvaginal mesh slings, it would seem to make sense that they be taken off the market. Such things are not unheard of when it comes to defective products. However, this does not seem to be the case,” said Bobby Lee, an Austin lawyer litigating transvaginal mesh lawsuits.

Consider the Oregon case of one woman who does not want to get out of bed some days. Her life has been turned upside down since the implantation of a mesh sling two years ago. She can barely walk, her sex life is negligible thanks to the mesh protruding from her vaginal wall, she finds it hard to participate in activities with her children, is in constant pain and needs to wear Depends to handle the increased flow of urine – which was supposed to stop when the mesh kit was implanted. The promised relief from urinary incontinence became a living nightmare for the plaintiff.

Even though the plaintiff made several trips to her doctor about her pain and physical difficulties, nothing was done. She is now on a very long waiting list to have the mesh removed, if that is possible, as in some instances, it is not. In some cases, the mesh has grown into vital organs and not all of it can be removed. The consequence of this defective product may then last many years; years of pain and other physical complications that may include permanent nerve damage.

”Interestingly, even with documented cases such as this, and thousands of others, there are specialists that suggest the mesh is safe to use and it is the fault of attorneys for this debacle, because they are focusing on the mesh’s complications. Other doctors are explicitly stating the mesh causes serious complications such as urethral erosion, organ injury, bladder issues, and organ exposure. If the mesh is considered to be safe by virtue of ignoring the complications, something is drastically wrong with that picture,” added Lee.

Lee, Gober & Reyna
11940 Jollyville Road #220-S
Austin, Texas 78759
Phone: 512.478.8080

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