White House Jobs Council Proposes More Visas for Skilled Immigrants | Law Firm Newswire

White House Jobs Council Proposes More Visas for Skilled Immigrants

Dallas, TX (Law Firm Newswire) November 25, 2011 – A recent White House Jobs Council Interim Report issued in October, 2011 calls for more skilled immigrants as a key component to economic recovery in the United States.

Citing Google, Intel, Yahoo! and Home Depot as successful American companies started by immigrants that employ hundreds of thousands of U.S. workers, the report queried whether the next great companies will be started by entrepreneurial talent that came to America to study but found a more welcoming business environment in China or South Korea, places that compete with the U.S. It reasoned that highly skilled immigrants create American jobs, and that means that the U.S. should change its immigration policies to make it easier for skilled workers from across the globe that have already been educated in the U.S. to stay here, start companies here, and hire U.S. workers.

In the Interim Report, prepared at the request of President Barack Obama earlier this year, the Council advised that significant law changes would be needed to help ensure that the next generation of global companies is started here in the United States instead of abroad.

“It is refreshing to see the Interim Report acknowledge the value of immigrant entrepreneurs, and to propose programs that develop foreign investment in the U.S. through special immigration benefits for investors,” said Dallas immigration lawyer Stewart Rabinowitz. “Now, only if Congress – that is, both sides of the isle – would quit bickering long enough to actually listen and act.”

The Council called for significant changes to U.S. immigration law. It proposed that foreign students with STEM degrees (science, technology, engineering or mathematics) from a U.S. university should get an automatic green card to stay in the country and work.

It also favors a new visa program for immigrant entrepreneurs, as well as accelerated EB-2, H-1B, EB-5 and E13 case adjudication. The Council also requested a four-fold increase in the number of foreign entrepreneurs allowed into the country.

Whether any of these changes make it into law remains to be seen. Rabinowitz said the Council’s legal immigration suggestions could have an immediate positive impact on the American economy.

To learn more, contact a Dallas immigration lawyer or Dallas immigration attorney at Rabinowitz & Rabinowitz, P.C., call 1.972.233.6200 or visit http://www.rabinowitzrabinowitz.com.

Rabinowitz & Rabinowitz, P.C.
14901 Quorum Drive, Suite 580
Dallas, Texas 75254
Phone: 972.233.6200

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