NFL Player's Family Sues League, Claiming Brain Injuries Contributed to Suicide | Law Firm Newswire

NFL Player’s Family Sues League, Claiming Brain Injuries Contributed to Suicide

Tampa, FL (Law Firm Newswire) February 19, 2013 - Family members are suing the National Football League (NFL) after the death of a player.

In May 2012, professional football player Junior Seau took his own life, and now his family is suing the NFL, claiming the suicide was the result of numerous brain injuries sustained during his career.

Tampa personal injury attorney Robert Joyce commented, “It is widely understood that brain injuries, especially repeated injuries, can cause not only physical damage, but permanent psychological damage as well. It seems possible that repeated head impacts could contribute to suicidal tendencies.”

As a linebacker, Seau received countless blows to the head, and the NFL did not give him information critical to his safety, according to the suit filed recently in California state court in San Diego.

Over 3,000 former NFL players have sued the league for head injuries sustained during their careers. The lawsuits accuse the NFL of failing to notify players of known links between repeated head impacts and cumulative brain injuries.

Seau played 20 seasons in the NFL, was selected for the Pro Bowl 12 times, and retired in 2009. At 43, he killed himself with a gunshot to the chest at his California home. On January 10, the National Institutes of Health said that upon studying samples of Seau's brain tissue, they had found evidence of a progressive brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

A master complaint filed in federal court in Philadelphia, where the various suits are consolidated, claims the league knew as far back as 40 years ago about the risk of repeated blows to the head. Allegedly, the NFL took no action to address the matter until 1994, and later attempted to suppress medical studies showing a link between injuries and subsequent brain damage.

Family and friends of individuals who have died with CTE have described them as being depressed, irritable, and having changes in personality. The disease was first identified in studies of former boxers who developed disorders similar to Parkinson's disease and dementia.

Seau's behavior seemed to change beginning in the mid-1990s, according to his family's lawsuit. He became forgetful, unable to concentrate, and eventually self-destructive and violent.

To learn more or to contact a Tampa personal injury lawyer at the Joyce & Reyes Law Firm, P.A. visit http://www.joyceandreyespa.com/ or call 1.888.771.1529.

Joyce and Reyes Law Firm, P.A.
307 S Hyde Park Ave,
Tampa, FL 33606
Call: 813.251.2007


View Larger Map

  • What to Do After a Car Accident
    Car accidents are potentially life-changing events that can do far more the physically cripple victims. Under many circumstances, car accidents also can bankrupt victims when the medical costs greatly exceed any insurance coverage amounts. The following tips should help to ensure maximum payouts when involved in a car accident. Almost everyone has a cellphone that […]
  • Uber, Lyft are driving accident fatalities
    In large cities, ride-hailing services provide an affordable alternative to taxi cabs, without the hassle of mass public transportation systems. Uber is the king of ride-hailing services, with Lyft a slightly distant second across the nation. Since their sudden rise starting in 2011, a new study suggests they have increased traffic fatalities in large cities […]
  • Common signs of nursing home abuse
    Placing a loved one in a nursing home is often a very difficult decision that a family has to make. Usually, a family makes this decision because ultimately they believe their loved one will have a better life and be well taken care of. However, in some Florida nursing facilities, families learn that not only […]

See other news sources publishing this article. BETA | Tags: , , , , , ,



Get headlines from Law Firm Newswire sent right to your inbox.

* indicates required