» When Elderly Parents Move In With Adult Children

When Elderly Parents Move In With Adult Children

Hook Law Center (formerly Oast & Hook)

Hook Law Center (formerly Oast & Hook)

Virginia Beach, VA (Law Firm Newswire) July 15, 2015 – With the cost of nursing homes and in-home nursing care at an all-time high, many adult children and their parents are turning to living together as a way to save money and maximize the parent's quality of life. Although such a move can be a positive change, it also represents a major adjustment, and preparing for the change as much as possible is important.

"When seniors move in with their adult children, it can be a challenging transition for everyone involved," said Andrew H. Hook, a Virginia elder law attorney with Hook Law Center, with offices in Virginia Beach and northern Suffolk. "However, there are some steps that adult children can take to ease the transition, such as hammering out the financial aspects, making the home safe for seniors and identifying resources available in the community."

The financial aspects of having adult parents can be complex. If there are siblings, there should be a discussion about whether, and how much, the siblings will contribute to the parent's care. The parent's potential contribution should also be considered. In some cases, the children may be able to claim the parent as a dependent for a tax deduction. An elder law attorney can address legal issues associated with the process, such as maintaining Medicaid eligibility.

One of the key changes that must be made when moving in an aging parent is making the home safe for seniors. This includes reinforcing railings, putting grab bars in the bathroom and shower and securing any unsecured rugs. Depending on the parent's needs, additional changes such as installing ramps or widening doors may also be necessary.

Caregiving is a challenging task, especially when the parent also lives in the home. Adult children should research available services in the community, such as respite care, adult day care, meal programs and transportation services. Having support available can make caregiving a much more manageable and healthy task.

Hook Law Center
295 Bendix Road, Suite 170
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452-1294
Phone: 757-399-7506
Fax: 757-397-1267

SUFFOLK
5806 Harbour View Blvd.
Suite 203
Suffolk VA 23435
Phone: 757-399-7506
Fax: 757-397-1267
http://www.hooklawcenter.com/

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