Stewart Rabinowitz Comments on Proposed Legislation that Would Provide Permanent Resident Status to Certain Treaty Investors | Law Firm Newswire

Stewart Rabinowitz Comments on Proposed Legislation that Would Provide Permanent Resident Status to Certain Treaty Investors

Dallas immigration lawyers

Dallas immigration lawyers - Rabinowitz & Rabinowitz, P.C.

Dallas, TX (Law Firm Newswire) September 11, 2015 – A bill has been introduced in Congress that would allow foreign nationals who are in the United States in E-2 status to become eligible to apply for permanent U.S. residency after 10 years in E-2 status.

As background, the United States has treaties with more than 60 countries that provide for investment. The treaties permit citizens of a treaty country to make an investment in the United States provided the treaty investor meets certain requirements. The E-2 treaty investor visa must make a substantial investment in an active commercial enterprise, and be coming to the United States to direct and develop that investment through a business entity that has the nationality of the treaty country.

Under current law, the treaty investor can renew his or her E-2 visa abroad or extend E-2 status in the United States as long as the approved E-2 investment continues. The E-2 Visa Improvement Act, H.R. 1834, would allow long-term E-2 treaty investors to become lawful permanent residents.

“Offering a path to permanent resident status to long-term E-2 nonimmigrant investors is a good idea,” said Stewart Rabinowitz, a prominent Dallas immigration attorney with Rabinowitz & Rabinowitz, P.C. “It will enhance the value of E-2 treaty benefits and provide a less expensive way for investors to bring their ingenuity, generate jobs and improve our economy. Overall, it will encourage greater investment in the United States.”

The E-2 Visa Improvement Act of 2015 was introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. David Jolly (R-FL). Jolly said that business owners who come to the United States on E-2 visas bring an “entrepreneurial spirit” and “fully integrate into our communities,” and they should be able to “take the next step in carrying out the American dream.”

For E-2 treaty investors, there is no direct path to permanent residence, a gap that the proposed legislation would fill. Unlike the EB-5 program, which provides lawful permanent resident status, but requires that the EB-5 new commercial enterprise employ at least 10 U.S. workers and that the EB-5 investor make a statutory minimum investment of at least $500,000, an E-2 treaty investor must make an investment determined to be “substantial,” based on the cost of establishing or purchasing the planned business.

It does not require a statutorily fixed minimum investment amount, which may be out of the reach of many foreign national investors. Under the proposed legislation, to qualify for lawful permanent resident status, the E-2 treaty investor must employ at least two full-time employees in addition to a 10-year period in E-2 status.

By Appointment Only
Three Galleria Tower
13155 Noel Road, Suite 900
Dallas, TX 75240
http://www.rabinowitzrabinowitz.com

  • USCIS to Limit Some Nonimmigrant Change or Extension of Status Applicants Based on New Public Charge Rule
    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on August 14, 2019, announced its final rule on inadmissibility on public charge grounds that imposes a new public benefit condition on individuals who apply for a change or extension of nonimmigrant status. The new rule was originally scheduled to take effect on October 15, 2019. But on October ...
  • USCIS Issues Proposed New H-1B Registration Rules
    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has proposed a rule change that requires each H-1B petitioning employer to pay a $10 filing fee for every electronic registration submitted to the agency for each H-1B worker who is to be counted in the H-1B cap selection. H-1B petitioning employers whose foreign national beneficiary qualifies for the ...
  • U.S. and Guatemala Sign Agreement Regarding Refugees Amidst Uncertain Legality
    President Donald Trump announced on July 26, 2019, that the United States and Guatemala have signed a controversial “safe third country” agreement, a key part of the president’s plan for reducing the influx of migrants at the U.S. border. Under the deal, asylum seekers from Central American nations — such as El Salvador and Honduras ...

Tags: , , , , ,



Get headlines from Law Firm Newswire sent right to your inbox.

* indicates required