criminal defense attorney | Law Firm Newswire - Part 2

Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) May 26, 2015 – All crimes have one thing in common: they begin with an arraignment process and a preliminary hearing. The law categorizes criminal offenses as felonies or misdemeanors, with misdemeanors being generally defined as lesser offenses (e.g. shop lifting, DWI) and felonies involving more serious offenses such as kidnapping or murder. Regardless of the classification of the offense, the ensuing process through the justice system to conviction or dismissal of charges is much the same, with minor differences per each jurisdiction. It all begins with an arraignment at the first appearance in court. […]


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Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) May 19, 2015 – The FBI has 77.7 million people listed in its master criminal database and add between 10,000 and 12,000 new names every day. Many Americans with criminal records cannot find employment even if the record is decades old, minor, has been dropped, not corrected or if the court found them not guilty. Although a daunting hurdle to surmount, having a record does not necessarily result in unemployability, an inability to obtain housing or secure a loan. One in every three American adults has a criminal record of some sort. The problem is […]


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Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) April 29, 2015 – Among the many factors that go into determining a convicted offender’s sentence is mental capacity. A defendant’s mental incapacity, once proven, may result in delayed sentencing until the individual is deemed better or may result in a reduced sentence under U.S. Sentencing Guidelines. Judges decide each case on its merits, as no two cases are ever the same. Diminished capacity is not applicable as a defense if the defendant’s mental incapacity was the result of voluntary ingestion of drugs or alcohol. State laws tend to vary on this issue. Also it […]


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Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) April 22, 2015 – T.V. crime shows have made many familiar with the part of the Miranda warning stating that if the offender cannot afford an attorney, the court may appoint one for them. The U.S. constitution guarantees the right of an accused to speak to an attorney. Public defenders came into being in the United States in 1963, as a result of a decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court in Gideon v. Wainwright. It stated the Sixth Amendment mandates that the government provide free legal counsel to indigent defendants in criminal cases. […]


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Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) February 17, 2015 – Everyone charged with a criminal offense has the right to ask for a lawyer. If they do not want one, they may appear pro se or pro per, meaning “on one’s own behalf.” Some individuals choose to go it on their own for several reasons. One may feel that he or she knows the facts of the case better than an attorney, may not trust lawyers, may not qualify for a court-appointed lawyer or may not want to pay for legal counsel on their own. The Sixth Amendment states that all […]


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Lakeland, FL (Law Firm Newswire) February 10, 2015 – The U.S. justice system not only entitles anyone charged with a criminal offense within the country to an attorney to defend the case, but also does not automatically consider those charged to be guilty Although exculpatory defenses used in criminal cases differ from state to state, many of the basic concepts involved in a defense are the same. One defense that tends to get a lot of media play is the plea of insanity. If a defendant was clinically insane at the time the crime took place, the court may find […]


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Okaloosa County, FL (Law Firm Newswire) January 16, 2015 – In an effort to call attention to the often life-changing effects of a criminal conviction, Florida attorney Steven G. Cobb has named January “Juvenile Crime Awareness Month.” In addition, Mr. Cobb is hoping to raise awareness of the fact that juvenile criminal misconduct may be indicative of an underlying brain disorder that has the potential to cause serious problems well into adulthood. While the law takes an offender’s age into account in criminal sentencing, the consequences of a criminal conviction can still be significant, even for youthful offenders. In certain […]


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